Throwback Thursday! In 2010, Dorothea Tanning: Early Designs for the Stage presented approximately twenty hand-drawn ballet costume designs by Dorothea Tanning (b.1910) created in collaboration with the early modernist choreographer, George Balanchine. Dating from 1945–1953, the designs were shown together for the first time, and were accompanied by archival photographs and ephemera related to the staged productions. 
This series explores the dynamic intersections of dance, performance, visual art, and costume, while drawing important parallels to Tanning’s early discoveries in both painting and sculpture. Taking the form of traditional fashion plates, the blithely rendered drawings are suggestive of bodies in motion and portrayals of outlandish characters through the quirky detailing and sensual drapery of the costumes. 
Images:
Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for Bayou, 1951. Graphite and gouache on green paper, 12 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches. Collection of the artist.
Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for The Witch (The Girl Before), 1950. Gouache on dark blue paper, 16 x 11 1/2 inches. Collection of the artist. 
Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for Night Shadow (A Guest), 1945. Watercolor and wash on paper, 13 7/8 x 9 7/8 inches. Collection of the artist.  Throwback Thursday! In 2010, Dorothea Tanning: Early Designs for the Stage presented approximately twenty hand-drawn ballet costume designs by Dorothea Tanning (b.1910) created in collaboration with the early modernist choreographer, George Balanchine. Dating from 1945–1953, the designs were shown together for the first time, and were accompanied by archival photographs and ephemera related to the staged productions. 
This series explores the dynamic intersections of dance, performance, visual art, and costume, while drawing important parallels to Tanning’s early discoveries in both painting and sculpture. Taking the form of traditional fashion plates, the blithely rendered drawings are suggestive of bodies in motion and portrayals of outlandish characters through the quirky detailing and sensual drapery of the costumes. 
Images:
Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for Bayou, 1951. Graphite and gouache on green paper, 12 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches. Collection of the artist.
Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for The Witch (The Girl Before), 1950. Gouache on dark blue paper, 16 x 11 1/2 inches. Collection of the artist. 
Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for Night Shadow (A Guest), 1945. Watercolor and wash on paper, 13 7/8 x 9 7/8 inches. Collection of the artist.  Throwback Thursday! In 2010, Dorothea Tanning: Early Designs for the Stage presented approximately twenty hand-drawn ballet costume designs by Dorothea Tanning (b.1910) created in collaboration with the early modernist choreographer, George Balanchine. Dating from 1945–1953, the designs were shown together for the first time, and were accompanied by archival photographs and ephemera related to the staged productions. 
This series explores the dynamic intersections of dance, performance, visual art, and costume, while drawing important parallels to Tanning’s early discoveries in both painting and sculpture. Taking the form of traditional fashion plates, the blithely rendered drawings are suggestive of bodies in motion and portrayals of outlandish characters through the quirky detailing and sensual drapery of the costumes. 
Images:
Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for Bayou, 1951. Graphite and gouache on green paper, 12 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches. Collection of the artist.
Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for The Witch (The Girl Before), 1950. Gouache on dark blue paper, 16 x 11 1/2 inches. Collection of the artist. 
Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for Night Shadow (A Guest), 1945. Watercolor and wash on paper, 13 7/8 x 9 7/8 inches. Collection of the artist. 

Throwback Thursday! In 2010, Dorothea Tanning: Early Designs for the Stage presented approximately twenty hand-drawn ballet costume designs by Dorothea Tanning (b.1910) created in collaboration with the early modernist choreographer, George Balanchine. Dating from 1945–1953, the designs were shown together for the first time, and were accompanied by archival photographs and ephemera related to the staged productions. 

This series explores the dynamic intersections of dance, performance, visual art, and costume, while drawing important parallels to Tanning’s early discoveries in both painting and sculpture. Taking the form of traditional fashion plates, the blithely rendered drawings are suggestive of bodies in motion and portrayals of outlandish characters through the quirky detailing and sensual drapery of the costumes. 

Images:

Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for Bayou, 1951. Graphite and gouache on green paper, 12 1/2 x 9 1/2 inches. Collection of the artist.

Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for The Witch (The Girl Before), 1950. Gouache on dark blue paper, 16 x 11 1/2 inches. Collection of the artist. 

Dorothea Tanning, Costume Design for Night Shadow (A Guest), 1945. Watercolor and wash on paper, 13 7/8 x 9 7/8 inches. Collection of the artist. 

Though well known in the 1950s for her experiments in assemblage and printmaking, and a friend of everyone from Max Ernst to John Cage, Sari Dienes has pretty much disappeared from the art-history map. This modest exhibit, aiming to resurrect her stature, focuses on the ink-roller impressions Dienes made of Manhattan streets, where she was assisted by a young Jasper Johns (who later called out Dienes as a significant influence). Mixing abstraction and the familiar, her monochrome images of manhole lids, rough pavement, and tread marks not only suggest a proto-Johns but also anticipate the contemporary work of trace-painter Ingrid Calame.” - Robert Shuster, The Village Voice

Sari Dienes will be on display from October 8 - November 16. 

Image: Sari Dienes, Tred Squares, C. 1953-1955. Ink on webril, 36 x 36 inches. Courtesy of the Sari Dienes Foundation, Pomona, NY. © Sari Dienes Foundation/ Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. 

Time again to highlight some of the exhibitions happening at some of our SoHo neighbors’ art spaces!

1. Gediminas Akstinas at Art in General

On view through Saturday, October 25

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"Gediminas Akstinas (b. 1961, lives and works in Vilnius) is a sculptor whose artistic practice is characterized by a combination of formalist and conceptual approaches. For the occasion of this exhibition, Akstinas created a sequence of watercolors, continuing a series-based body of work not revisited since the 1980s. The selection of new paintings on view features a repeating cup—an everyday object that is both domestic and mechanical in its production."

2. The Swiss Institute's Annual Design Series: Inaugural Edition, Fin de Siècle

On view through Sunday, November 23

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"A curatorial homage to Eugène Ionesco’s 1952 absurdist play The Chairs, the exhibition will include an eclectic array of late 20th century design pieces sourced from museum and private collections. Presented in an immersive mise-en-scène, this unique selection of chairs resonates with the drama of Ionesco’s tragic farce, 20 years after the celebrated avant-garde playwright’s passing.”

3. Mira Friedlaender: Half of What’s There at Recess

On view through Saturday, October 25

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"Over the course of her Session, the artist will unpack, document, and inventory the life’s work of Bilge Civelekoglu Friedlaender.

Bilge came to New York at the age of 24 to become an artist. A Turkish émigré active from the 1970s-1990s, she produced non-objective work in the form of works with paper, installations, and sculpture. She was also Mira’s mother.

Each week of the Session she will present a new installation of excavated works. She will display her mother’s work alongside the materials that have housed and informed it: storage bins, packing supplies, and a selection of original ephemera.”

Images:

Gediminas Akstinas, Untitled, 2014. Watercolour, 43 cm x 27.5 cm. Image courtesy the artist. 

Fin de Siècle installation view.

Ugo La Pietra, Poltroncina Chair, 1983. Lacquered tubular steel, leather, paint. Courtesy Dennis Freedman.

Mira Friedlaender image courtesy of Recess’s website.

Closing this week! It’s your last chance to see Kimsooja's Thread Routes - Chapter I film, on view in The Lab through Thursday, October 2. This film explores the Peruvian weaving culture set amid the highlands of Machu Picchu.  

Image: Kimsooja, Thread Routes - Chapter I, 2010. 29:31, sound. Still from 16mm film transferred to HD format. Courtesy of the artist’s website

Thread Lines artists Sheila Hicks, Beryl Korot, Alan Shields, Lenore Tawney, and Anne Wilson will be included in a fiber arts exhibit opening at the Institute of Contemporary Art Boston on October 1.

The 34 artists with their around 50 works show how over the decades … preconceptions about fiber art have been confronted, embraced, and unraveled.” You can read the entire Hyperallergic review here

Fiber: Sculpture 1960–present is organized by the ICA Boston and will be on view at the ICA from October 1, 2014 through January 4, 2015. Following its premiere in Boston, the exhibition will tour nationally to the Wexner Center for the Arts, Columbus, Ohio (January 30 – April 5, 2015) and Des Moines Art Center, Iowa (May 8, 2015 – August 2, 2015).

Thread Lines will be on display at The Drawing Center through December 14. 

Image: Sheila Hicks, Detail from Banisteriopsis II, 1965-66/2010. Wool and linen, dimensions variable. Courtesy of The Institute of Contemporary Art/Boston, Gift of the artist in honor of Jenelle Porter, © Charles Mayer. 

  1. Camera: Canon EOS 5D Mark III
  2. Aperture: f/13
  3. Exposure: 1/3th
  4. Focal Length: 90mm

Up this week on our online gallery is Thread Lines artist Anne Wilson (b. 1949, Detroit, MI) who choreographs and performs in her latest work To Cross (Walking New York), which uses The Center’s four central columns as a weaving loom. Recalling the physical structure and operations of the loom itself, the piece’s four participants “walk” around the twelve foot columns, carrying a spool of thread to form a standard weaving cross (a method used to keep warp threads in order).

Image: Still from Anne Wilson’s To Cross (Walking New York), 2014.
Filmed by Mary Billyou.

On view through December 14. Repost from @anticipatedstranger —- Xanti Schawinsky


Today and tomorrow Anne Wilson’s To Cross (Walking New York) will be activated from 12:30-5:30pm as a part of our Thread Lines exhibit.
The durational performance, which will take place over the course of two months, will result in the fabrication of a five by thirty-four foot sculpture: a colorful cross composed of innumerable strands of thread.
See all performance dates==>goo.gl/bxeZWl

Today and tomorrow Anne Wilson’s To Cross (Walking New York) will be activated from 12:30-5:30pm as a part of our Thread Lines exhibit.
The durational performance, which will take place over the course of two months, will result in the fabrication of a five by thirty-four foot sculpture: a colorful cross composed of innumerable strands of thread.
See all performance dates==>goo.gl/bxeZWl

Today and tomorrow Anne Wilson’s To Cross (Walking New York) will be activated from 12:30-5:30pm as a part of our Thread Lines exhibit.
The durational performance, which will take place over the course of two months, will result in the fabrication of a five by thirty-four foot sculpture: a colorful cross composed of innumerable strands of thread.
See all performance dates==>goo.gl/bxeZWl

Today and tomorrow Anne Wilson’s To Cross (Walking New York) will be activated from 12:30-5:30pm as a part of our Thread Lines exhibit.

The durational performance, which will take place over the course of two months, will result in the fabrication of a five by thirty-four foot sculpture: a colorful cross composed of innumerable strands of thread.

See all performance dates==>goo.gl/bxeZWl

Our Xanti Schawinsky: Head Drawings and Faces of Warexhibit is on view!

The Drawing Center Hours:
Wed-Sun Noon-6pm
Thur 12-8pm

Photo by Jose Andres Ramirez.

On view through Dec 14 in Thread Lines. #Repost from @seekcollective —- Louise Bourgeois’s fabric works…up now @drawingcenter …
*swoon*

#seekinspiration #seekart #louisebourgeois #textiles (at The Drawing Center)